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Tuesday, May 12, 2020 | History

3 edition of The fairness doctrine and the equal opportunities doctrine found in the catalog.

The fairness doctrine and the equal opportunities doctrine

The fairness doctrine and the equal opportunities doctrine

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Published by Library of Congress, Congressional Research Service, Major Issues System in [Washington, D.C.] .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Fairness doctrine (Broadcasting) -- United States,
  • Equal Time Rule (Broadcasting) -- United States,
  • Broadcasting -- Law and legislation -- United States

  • Edition Notes

    StatementThomas M. Durbin
    SeriesCRS issue brief -- order code IB82087, Issue brief (Library of Congress. Major Issues System) -- no. IB82087, Major studies and issue briefs of the Congressional Research Service -- 1987-88, reel 2, fr. 01266
    ContributionsLibrary of Congress. Major Issues System
    The Physical Object
    FormatMicroform
    Pagination13 p.
    Number of Pages13
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL15455753M

    asked Congress to repeal the Fairness Doctrine. No action was taken. – The FCC determined the Fairness Doctrine was not codified in In , the D.C. Circuit Court upheld the FCC by ruling that the Amendment did not codify the Fairness Doctrine. – The FCC formally abolished the Fairness Doctrine on grounds that: 1.   Some Democrats in Congress are concerned about the conservative nature of talk radio. They would like to reinstate something like the now-defunct Fairness Doctrine. But Rep. Mike Pence (R .

      The fairness doctrine has nothing to do with “equal time,” which usually concerns opponents in political campaigns. It has little to do with absolute “balance” within a specific program.   Since the shootings in Arizona the call to reinstate the Fairness Doctrine have been ramped up - especially with many calling for an end to violent rhetoric. Conservatives believe this will silence right-wing radio, but as I showed earlier, right-wing radio thrived with the Doctrine in place. The right would also have us believe that.

    The equal-time rule should not be confused with the now-defunct FCC fairness doctrine, which dealt with presenting balanced points of view on matters of public importance. The Zapple Doctrine (part of a specific provision of the fairness doctrine) was similar to the equal-time rule, but applied to different political campaign participants. Weaknesses of LED and Fairness Doctrine LED-->economic equality may never happen if we treat women and men as exactly the same. Policy like Title VII and the Equal Pay Act have neither substantially changed the demographics of the labor force by ending sex segregation and eliminating the pay gap, nor made it legally possible for women to ascend.


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The fairness doctrine and the equal opportunities doctrine Download PDF EPUB FB2

Broadcast fairness: Doctrine, practice, prospects: a reappraisal of the fairness doctrine and equal time rule (Longman series in public communication) 1st Edition by Ford Rowan (Author) › Visit Amazon's Ford Rowan Page. Find all the books, read about the author, and more.

Get this from a library. The fairness doctrine and the equal opportunities doctrine in political broadcasting. [Thomas M Durbin; Library of Congress.

Congressional Research Service.]. equal-time rule, a Federal Communications Commission rule that requires equal air time for all major candidates competing for political office.

It was preceded by the fairness doctrine, abolished inwhich required radio and television broadcasters to air contrasting views on controversial public issues.

In essence, the fairness doctrine required radio and television broadcast licensees to cover important and controversial issues of interest in the community, and to provide opportunity.

1] EQUAL OPPORTUNITIES AND FAIRNESS DOCTRINES Intwo years after Congress enacted this doctrine, the Federal Radio Commission (the predecessor to the FCC) applied the under-\ lying fairness principle to "all discussions of issues of importance to. What is The Fairness Doctrine.

Summary: The fairness doctrine was a Federal Communications Commission (FCC) policy. The FCC believed that broadcast licenses (required for both radio and terrestrial TV stations) were a form of public trust and, as such, licensees should provide balanced and fair coverage of controversial issues.

The fairness doctrine was a Federal Communications Commission (FCC) policy. The FCC believed that broadcast licenses (required for both radio and terrestrial TV stations) were a form of public trust and, as such, licensees should provide balanced and fair coverage of controversial : Kathy Gill.

Equal-time presents a "minute for minute" type of rule to be used when presenting candidates running for election. The Fairness Doctrine asserts the "paramount right of the public to hear a reasonably balanced presentation of all responsible viewpoints on particular issues" and "the licensee's duty to operate in the public interest." In short, the Fairness Doctrine "errs" on the side of public.

The Equal Protection Clause, as presently construed in American constitutional doctrine, generally requires discriminatory intent. On the other hand, persons accused of crimes are afforded rights in the Bill of Rights that are not grounded in equality, but in fairness.

In an effort to pre-empt such a repeal, Democratic Senator Fritz Hollings introduced the Fairness in Broadcasting Act in Marchwhich would have fully enshrined the Fairness Doctrine. The Fairness Doctrine, which was repealed inrequired broadcast licensees to present controversial issues of public importance in a honest, equal and balanced manner.

The doctrine began in and required broadcasters to give equal time to all sides of a political issue, or put their broadcast license in jeopardy. The Reagan FCC stopped enforcing it in   However, the Fairness Doctrine is different from the Equal Time rule, which is still in force and requires equal time be given to legally qualified political candidates.

Sinclair could even put the Fairness Doctrine back in play, a rule established in to require that the networks—all three of them—air all sides of issues.

The doctrine was abandoned in the s with the proliferation of cable, leaving citizens with little recourse over broadcasters that misuse the public airwaves, except to oppose the renewal of licenses. The fairness doctrine is not the same as the equal-time rule. The fairness doctrine deals with discussion of controversial issues, while the equal-time rule deals only with political candidates.

The fairness doctrine deals with discussion of controversial issues, while the equal-time rule deals only with political candidates. When the fairness doctrine came before the courts inthey decided that since the doctrine was not mandated by Congress, it did not have to be enforced.

FCC suspended all but the two. The one aspect of the Fairness Doctrine that has never been officially abolished is the Zapple Doctrine, a rule that required that supporters of a major-party candidate be able to get time to respond to broadcasts by supporters of the opponent, effectively "quasi-equal opportunities." The doctrine was argued by supporters of John Kerry in their.

Fairness Doctrine. 44 likes. INFORMATION: Fairness Doctrine policy in the United States. Given the fact that the Zapple Doctrine was based on an interpretation of the fairness doctrine, which has no current legal effect, we conclude that the Zapple Doctrine similarly has no current legal effect.

So why didn’t the FCC’s equal opportunities rule, which is still in effect, apply to this situation. The left in America has pushed this Equality and Fairness doctrine for decades believing that it is needed in America because America is inherently a racist nation. One belief by Liberals is that employers or the bourgeoisie are naturally racist against those of “color.”.

As Almond points out in the opinion piece, the Fairness Doctrine was created to ensure the public’s airwaves were used for the public good and that broadcasters provided a reasonable opportunity for differing viewpoints to be heard on issues.

"The doctrine is a typical product of the socialist sentimentality that dreams of combining government ownership with intellectual freedom. As applied to television and radio broadcasting, the fairness doctrine demands that equal opportunity be given to all sides of a controversial issue—on the grounds of the notion that "the people owns the airwaves" and, therefore, all factions of "the.The Fairness Doctrine was a FCC rule that required station owners to broadcast “honest, equitable, and balanced programming”.

This replaced a rule called “The Mayflower Doctrine” which required broadcasters to “provide full and equal opportunity for the presentation to the public of all sides of public issues.”.